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Only 5% of Nevada Child Care Workers Get Background Checks Done on Time

By Michael Klazema on 2/23/2012

In a recent Nevada investigation, it was found that only about 5% of the state’s daycare workers have had their required background checks done before they began working. This is only one of the frightening facts that a local new station was able to uncover. Though these employees are required by law to go through a full criminal background check before they begin working with children, 95% of them actually start working before the results are complete. This means that it is possible that a person with a criminal background would have access to children.

On top of background checks being delayed, inspections of the sites, which also include audits of background checks, were also running behind schedule. Some of these inspections were found to be as much as 8 months behind schedule.

Nevada state law, not surprisingly, makes it mandatory for anyone who is working in a day care center to go through a background check. Specifically state law makers are screening those who may turn out to be a threat to children like those with any charges of neglect, child abuse, some drug convictions, any sexual crimes and any felony. By state law, these background checks must be done within three days of the new employee being hired. The fact that there are people working in day care centers for as little as three days without being thoroughly checked is alarming for many parents, but that isn’t even the case...most of these people are not being checked for much longer than that, up to three weeks from the day they were hired. This wait could certainly be creating a potential problem.

When the Nevada State Bureau of Healthcare Quality and Compliance was questioned about the delay, they put the blame on individual child care centers for not following state rules. However, since the inspections are so far behind, it is difficult to find out which centers are not being compliant with the rules.

One way to ensure compliance would be to streamline the screening process by partnering with a third party background check company like backgroundchecks.com. Due to the enormous volume of searches they perform they have already perfected the re-verification process of instant searches that result in hits and brought the research time down to just a few days instead of a weeklong process. During that re-verification backgroundchecks.com can also apply standardized grading criteria so that offenses that would NOT lead an applicant to be barred from working in a child care facility would be removed. That way the child care center operators would know that in the final reports they would only be looking at criminal records that according to predefined criteria would typically lead the child care center to bar the applicant. Saving the center time and ensuring the consistent application of screening standards within and across nursing homes in the state of Nevada.

About backgroundchecks.com -

backgroundchecks.com - a founding member of the National Association of Professional Background Screeners (NAPBS®) - serves thousands of customers nationwide, from small businesses to Fortune 100 companies by providing comprehensive screening services.  Headquartered in Dallas, Texas, with an Eastern Operations Center in Chapin, S.C., backgroundchecks.com is home to one of the largest online criminal conviction databases in the industry. For more information about backgroundchecks’ offerings, please visit www.backgroundchecks.com.

Source: http://www.mynews4.com/news/story/DAYCARE-NEVADA/Bz9yYDqpwkaT6JKi4V6Lpw.cspx


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