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City Changing Background Check Policy for Commissions and Committees

By Michael Klazema on 2/29/2012

The city of Mentor, OH is making some major changes to their policies when it comes to background checks for those who serve on city commissions and committees. The problem is, some residents believe the city is moving in the wrong direction.

In 2010, it became mandatory for both paid employees and volunteers who work on commissions and committees to undergo background checks. The new law will no longer make it mandatory to background check volunteers, only paid employees. This could certainly make it possible for those with criminal backgrounds to start making decisions about the city and serving on committees that could even be working with children.

Organizations who run background checks on some of their employees and volunteers, but not all of them, run the risk of criminals serving on their committees. Not only could this be dangerous to others on the committees, it could be a liability should this committee member commit a crime while they serve.

Companies like backgroundchecks.com could help the city of Mentor effectively background check all of their committee members by using some of their products like Single State OneSEARCH which would search for criminal records in the state of Ohio. For the city to promote the safest environment, the step of checking all members would be the safest thing to do.

About backgroundchecks.com -

backgroundchecks.com - a founding member of the National Association of Professional Background Screeners (NAPBS®) - serves thousands of customers nationwide, from small businesses to Fortune 100 companies by providing comprehensive screening services.  Headquartered in Dallas, Texas, with an Eastern Operations Center in Chapin, S.C., backgroundchecks.com is home to one of the largest online criminal conviction databases in the industry. For more information about backgroundchecks’ offerings, please visit www.backgroundchecks.com.

 

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Source: http://mentor.patch.com/articles/city-council-discusses-changing-background-check-policy


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