Blog

 
     

Could Background Checks Become a Requirement for Vacation Rental Properties in Fort Lauderdale?

By Michael Klazema on 9/20/2015
Come November 1st, owners of vacation rental homes in Fort Lauderdale will become a little more limited in who they are allowed to have as tenants. The Florida city recently approved a new set of rules regarding how vacation rental properties are used. Specifically, the new law will make it so there can no more than two tenants per bedroom in any given vacation rental home or cottage. However, locals want other rules applied to the new law, such as a limit on total guests per rental, or a background check requirement for anyone renting out a property.

Currently, the new law does include one stipulation regarding criminal activity. Convicted sex offenders will not be allowed to occupy vacation rental properties that are "within 1,400 feet" of schools, school bus stops, daycare or childcare facilities, parks, or playgrounds. However, at a recent City Commission meeting, local residents asked that commissioners go one step further. Specifically, residents want to bar sexual predators and other dangerous criminals from occupying any local vacation rental, regardless of proximity to schools or parks.

The City Commission has a tough task to deal with here, thanks to the time sensitive nature of getting the new law to a fully realized point. The commission passed the law on August 18th but wants to have it in effect by November 1st. Needless to say, that window doesn't give a lot of time for fixes and revisions.

The original goal was to have the law in place by the time Fort Lauderdale's tourist season rolls around. Indeed, the primary purpose of the new vacation rental rules is to cut down on the rowdy partying that tends to take place at those properties during tourist season. By limiting tenant numbers and imposing other regulations, the City Commission is hoping to keep out-of-town visitors from getting too out of control.

Still, locals seem to think that the new law doesn't go far enough in keeping Fort Lauderdale a safe, family-friendly place.Background checks for all visitors would help to keep known violent offenders, thieves, drug dealers, and other offenders out of the area during high-traffic times. Since partying is common for Fort Lauderdale tourists, particularly among those who rent out houses for a week or weekend, things can get fairly chaotic during tourist season. Background checks would hopefully reduce the likelihood of criminal activity playing out in the midst of that chaos.

Already, the new law will require people who rent out their homes to pay a significant fee, $750 initially and $500 for annual renewal. Money from those fees could help fund a more comprehensive background check policy for renters if the City Commission does decide to heed requests from local residents.

http://www.sun-sentinel.com/local/broward/fort-lauderdale/fl-lauderdale-vacation-rental-meeting-20150918-story.html
Industry News
  Florida

Tag Cloud
Categories
Recent Posts

Latest News

  • June 20 Repeat background checks are becoming more common, with companies in India leading the charge. What does this trend look like, and how can employers embrace it now to stay ahead of the curve?
  • June 19

    Every federal job involves a background check of some kind. These background checks and how they are evaluated vary based on job, department, and security clearance level.


  • June 18

  • June 14 Ban the box laws aim to improve opportunities for employment. Could they have the opposite effect instead?
  • June 13 Jacobs Petroleum Products is a regional petroleum company that operates throughout Pennsylvania, West Virginia, Ohio, and Maryland. Apart from their employees carrying much responsibility and have frequent contact with customers, the company’s hiring also tends to be segmented since individual store managers are responsible for hiring talent for their own stores. In this employment landscape, Jacobs Petroleum Products needed a reliable and effective way to screen its new hires for criminal infractions and other red flags.
  • June 12

    The University of Wisconsin System may tweak its hiring and reference check processes. The potential changes come after one of UW’s assistant deans was accused of sexual harassment.


  • June 07 Stories of abuse by coaches in youth sports leagues continue to crop up around the country, but rules and guidelines remain patchy and enforcement is often lacking. The struggle to implement an effective system continues nationwide.
  • June 07 Financial background checks, usually referred to as credit history checks, can be an effective way to find out if a candidate is fit to handle accounts, financial data, and other assets at your business.
  • June 06 The Society for Human Resource Management and the Charles Koch Institute recently commissioned a survey to find out how willing employers were to hire people with criminal records. The study indicates that managers, HR professionals, and employees themselves are becoming more comfortable with the idea of hiring and working with ex-offenders.
  • June 04 Are fingerprint background checks the gold standard for employee screening, or are they overhyped? We look at some of the myths and misconceptions surrounding these checks.