Blog

 
     

U.S. Senators Wants Terror Watch List Checks for Mass Transit Employees

By Michael Klazema on 12/19/2016
Per recent reports, a pair of United States Senators wants to revise nationwide policies regarding mass transit employee background checks. After 9/11, all aspects of air travel were tightened and made more secure, including employee background checks. Similar regulations never trickled down to other transportation industries, including rail and bus transit.

New York’s Charles Schumer and New Jersey’s Cory Booker are leading the charge to change that fact. Per an article from NJ.com, Schumer recently went on record with the belief that all passenger bus drivers and commuter train workers should be required to go through more in-depth background screenings. These screening, he said, should include checks against terrorist watch lists.

Per a report from CBS New York, Schumer is not the first person to recommend such a policy shift for rail and bus operators. In 2007, the 9/11 Commission recommended that rail and bus transit employees have their names and aliases checked against terrorist watch lists. Despite the recommendation, there was never any legislative requirement to force train companies or mass transit companies to add a terrorist watch list step to their employee background check processes, coverage notes.

As background check professionals have explained, terrorist watch list data isn’t the type of information that would be pulled in a standard county or state criminal background check. An alias search or a background check run through a nationwide or multijurisdictional database would be more likely to include information gleaned from terrorist watch lists. CBS New York contacted major rail transit companies, including Amtrak and MTA. Neither transit firms would say outright whether their employee background checks incorporated data from terror lists.

Because of recent incidents in Europe, Schumer and Booker are both particularly concerned about the state of railway security in the United States. In March, an attack on a three-carriage train at a Brussels metro station killed 20 people.

The Department of Homeland Security and TSA appear to have been looking at requiring terrorist watch list checks for mass transit employees. The CBS New York report says that there is currently “an action pending to require the screenings.” There is no indication for when this “action” could become a nationwide rule. As reports note, Schumer and Booker are pushing for the two government departments to move a bit faster so that they can finalize the rule sooner rather than later.

Sources:

http://www.nj.com/traffic/index.ssf/2016/12/booker_schumer_want_transit_workers_checked_agains.html

http://newyork.cbslocal.com/2016/12/12/transit-workers-terror-watch-list/

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2016_Brussels_bombings

Tag Cloud
Categories
Recent Posts

Latest News

  • October 11 Sporting organizations have long maintained lists of people barred for misconduct. A new agency wants to collect those names into a publicly searchable database.
  • October 09 In July, Ohio Governor John Kasich signed an executive order requiring criminal background checks for all Medicaid providers. Some healthcare professionals, particularly counsellors to drug addicts, worry the new rule could cost them their jobs.
  • October 05 After a city in Georgia adopted ban the box rules to increase fairness in hiring, unforeseen conflicts with additional city regulations rendered the change ineffective. The city must now find a fix. 
  • October 04 Whether you are applying for a job that involves driving or renewing your car insurance policy, your driving record can have an impact on what comes next. At backgroundchecks.com, we offer a way to check the accuracy of your record.
  • October 03 What should employers expect to see on criminal history reports, and what should job seekers expect these checks to reveal? We take a look at what shows up on criminal background checks.
  • October 02 Employers across the country are becoming more open to hiring people with criminal records. The reasons behind the shift range from new laws to the state of the job market.
  • October 01 Insurance points can affect how much you pay for your auto insurance policy. How are these points assessed and what do you need to know about them?
  • September 28 A driver’s license check includes more than just details about moving violations. Here’s what to expect if an employer or insurance provider pulls your driving record.
  • September 28

    Your driving record can impact your car insurance rates—and coverage options—in several ways. Learn how insurance companies use motor vehicle records to adjust their rates.


  • September 27 — With an aging population, long-term in-home care options are becoming more popular. In many cases, state governments have failed to provide thorough vetting procedures, leading to incidents of harm.