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Moving Company Startup in New York Emphasizes Background Checks

By Michael Klazema on 2/1/2017
Companies like Uber have changed the landscape of personal transportation, allowing regular citizens to accept taxi-like fares through a smartphone app. Uber and other “ridesharing services” like Lyft have been among the bigger entrepreneurial success stories of the decade so far. The most common criticism these companies have faced, reports explain, is that their driver background checks aren’t thorough enough to ensure customer safety.

An entrepreneur from the Syracuse, New York area, Carlos Suarez is the founder of Truxx, an app-based business that shares similarities with Uber. The business revolves around transportation. Customers can request fares via an app, and the company maintains a team of drivers that respond to requests from the app. Truxx is Uber for stuff, coverage explains: a moving company of sorts that connects people who are moving heavy or bulky objects with drivers who have trucks.

Suarez was inspired when a friend of his was trying to get his broken snow blower to the shop to be fixed. The friend didn’t have a vehicle big enough for the job and said something to Suarez about wishing he had “a buddy with a truck.” Suarez figured he could provide that moving buddy through an Uber-style app and Truxx was born. The startup’s Twitter account describes the business model as “Uber meets Uhaul.”

From the very beginning, he claims, Suarez understood the importance of running background checks on drivers. With Uber, customers are putting their personal safety into the hands of their drivers, he observed. Truxx only carries cargo and not people, but customers are still trusting their belongings to the drivers. Since the stuff that Truxx moves tends to be large and expensive—from TVs to appliances to furniture—it was important to Saurez establish a background check policy, he says.

Per an interview with Suarez conducted by Syracuse.com, Truxx runs thorough background checks of each driver. These checks include criminal background screenings, driver’s license verification checks, and driving record checks. The goal is to find red flags that might make a driver unfit for the job at hand—whether due to a history of theft, a habit of reckless driving, or other relevant charges.

Suarez noted that his Truxx mobile application currently has a 4.5-star rating on the Apple App Store.

Sources:

http://www.syracuse.com/news/index.ssf/2017/01/carlos_suarez_leadership.html

https://www.f6s.com/truxx

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