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September 2017 compliance update

By Michael Klazema on 10/11/2017
(Federal) Senate Bill 842, regarding Ban-the-Box

This bill prohibits Federal agencies and Federal contractors from requesting that an applicant for employment disclose criminal history record information before the applicant has received a conditional offer, and for other purposes. It was placed on the Senate Legislative Calendar under General Orders on 9/25/2017.

California Assembly Bill 168, regarding Wage Equity

This bill would prohibit an employer, including state and local government employers, from seeking salary history information about an applicant for employment, except as otherwise provided. The bill would require an employer, except state and local government employers, upon reasonable request, to provide the pay scale for a position to an applicant for employment. The bill would specify that a violation of its provisions would not be subjected to the misdemeanor provision. It was enrolled and presented to the Governor on 9/25/17.

California Assembly Bill 1008, regarding Employment Screening

This bill adds Section 12952 to the Government Code and repeals Section 432.9 of the Labor Code, relating to employment discrimination. It was enrolled and presented to the Governor on 9/26/17.

California Senate Bill 393, regarding Sealed Records

This bill would authorize a person who has suffered an arrest that did not result in a conviction to petition the court to have his or her arrest sealed and not expunged. It was enrolled and presented to the Governor on 9/21/17.

Ohio House Bill 6, regarding Criminal History Information
This bill prohibits a person who publishes or disseminates criminal record information from soliciting or accepting a fee to remove, correct, modify, or refrain from publishing or otherwise disseminating the information. It further provides criminal and civil remedies for a violation of the prohibition. It passed on 9/27/16


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