Blog

 
     

Connecticut Passes the Amended Ban the Box Bill

By Michael Klazema on 7/11/2016   |   Tags:   ban the box  Connecticut

Connecticut passed an amended version of House Bill 5237 relating to employment-related protections for people with a criminal conviction record. The modified “Ban the Box” bill states, “No employer shall inquire about a prospective employee’s prior arrests, criminal charges, or convictions on an initial employment application, unless (1) the employer is required to do so by an applicable state or federal law, or (2) a security or fidelity bond or an equivalent bond is required for the position for which the prospective employee is seeking employment.” The new law allows an employee or prospective employee to file a complaint with the Labor Commissioner alleging an employer’s violation.  The amended parts of the bill will go into effect on January 1, 2017.

Read More »

OPM Proposes Federal Ban the Box Rule

By Michael Klazema on 5/6/2016   |   Tags:   ban the box  OPM

The Office of Personnel Management wants to ban the box for all federal employers. The rule, if approved, would remove criminal history questions from job applications and delay background checks until after employers have extended conditional offers of employment.

Read More »


Tag Cloud
Categories
Recent Posts

Latest News

  • May 04 — Indiana’s governor signed an executive order banning the box for jobs in the public sector. The order makes Indiana the 27th state to implement a ban the box policy at the state level.
  • February 09 — Kentucky Governor Matt Bevin signed an executive order banning the box in the state government’s executive branch.
  • January 09 — “Ban the box” legislation has rapidly spread across the country, emerging as city or county ordinances and even as statewide laws. Now, however, an Indiana State Senator wants to ban “ban the box” ordinances in the state.
  • December 20 — The Mayor of Los Angeles recently signed into law an initiative that bans the box for private employers. The law also forces private employers to follow an eight-point list of considerations recommended by the EEOC before making any adverse employment decisions based on criminal history.
  • December 13 — The University of Minnesota has elected to “ban the box” and remove about criminal history from its student admission applications. Prospective students will still be expected to self-disclose past sex offenses or academic dishonesty issues.
  • August 19 — A faith-based organization in Duluth, Minnesota is fighting to help ex-criminal offenders find places to live. The organization wants to create a financial program to reimburse landlords for any damages caused by ex-offenders.
  • July 14 — Tompkins County is officially the third county in New York to ban the box for public jobs and the 11th jurisdiction to make the decision. The county's policy includes an unusual way of keeping the hiring process as unbiased as possible when dealing with applicants who have criminal histories.
  • July 11

    Connecticut passed an amended version of House Bill 5237 relating to employment-related protections for people with a criminal conviction record. The modified “Ban the Box” bill states, “No employer shall inquire about a prospective employee’s prior arrests, criminal charges, or convictions on an initial employment application, unless (1) the employer is required to do so by an applicable state or federal law, or (2) a security or fidelity bond or an equivalent bond is required for the position for which the prospective employee is seeking employment.” The new law allows an employee or prospective employee to file a complaint with the Labor Commissioner alleging an employer’s violation.  The amended parts of the bill will go into effect on January 1, 2017.

  • May 27 — Last year, New York City banned the box for private and public employers alike. Now, the city's Commission on Human Rights wants to expand the reach of the law to dictate when and how employers can disclose their background check requirements.
  • May 06 — The Office of Personnel Management wants to ban the box for all federal employers. The rule, if approved, would remove criminal history questions from job applications and delay background checks until after employers have extended conditional offers of employment.