Blog

 
     

What Is Included in a TSA Background Check?

By Michael Klazema on 3/7/2018

The TSA (Transportation Security Administration) requires extensive background checks for personnel before they are permitted to access restricted areas in and around airports. These checks became more rigorous after September 11th, 2001 to close any security gaps that might make it possible to compromise the safety of an airport or airplane.

TSA background checks have also been updated since the terror attacks of 2001 in response to various incidents and security breaches. In 2015, the TSA announced updates to its personnel background checks after discovering a baggage handler had been smuggling firearms aboard commercial flights.

A TSA background check is extremely rigorous and includes the following items:

  • Fingerprinting and fingerprint processing to check against FBI criminal databases and FBI terrorist watch lists
  • Felony and misdemeanor criminal searches at the county, state, and federal level
  • Checks of Federal Aviation Administration records to verify pilot licenses, medical certificates, and more
  • Air carrier record reviews to ensure personnel have gone through proper training processes
  • Searches for drug- or alcohol-related crimes or incidents dating back two years
  • Driving history checks in search of past motor vehicle violations, license suspensions, or other red flags
  • Social Security Number validations to check for fraud and verify a candidate’s current residential address
  • License or certificate verifications to make sure the candidate is qualified to work in a TSA-approved capacity
  • Workers compensation history to see if the candidate or employee has a history of workplace accidents, injuries, or settlements
  • Reference checks to verify information provided by the candidate or employee

In addition to these checks, the TSA announced in 2015 it would start using “real-time, recurring background checks” to keep tabs on existing personnel. These checks help the TSA catch the latest charges and convictions on an employee’s record.

The 2015 rule change also means airline and airport personnel would have to go through standard TSA security checks when flying as passengers. Previously, TSA employees could bypass airport security, even if taking a personal flight.

Sources: 

http://info.natacs.aero/id-and-badging/background-checks

https://www.backgroundchecks.com/community/Post/4371/TSA-Expands-Background-Checks-for-Airline-and-Airport-Employees



Tag Cloud
Categories
Recent Posts

Latest News

  • August 10 Moore Advanced teamed up with backgroundchecks.com to secure the best possible hires. Read more about how this process has assisted them.
  • August 10 An adjudication withheld is a court agreement that doesn’t qualify as a conviction but can make matters confusing for individuals applying for jobs. Should you disclose a withheld adjudication to a prospective employer?
  • August 09 With adults now legally using recreational marijuana in numerous states, and with additional legalization efforts in the wings, expungement of old and minor drug-related convictions is more important than ever.
  • August 07 A West Virginia TV station is pushing the state’s Child Protective Services and Department of Health and Human Services to answer questions about background check policies. A CPS employee was recently charged with contributing to the delinquency of a minor, domestic assault, and threatening a police officer.
  • August 02 Woes continue for ridesharing companies struggling to keep riders safe after a man, illegally in the United States, was arrested and accused of several rapes dating back years.
  • July 31 South Carolina legislators recently passed a new law that will change the language of the state’s expungement policy. The new law will make expungement possible for repeat offenders. The previous law only allowed first offenses to be scrubbed from the public record.
  • July 26

    Hawaii employers have been banned from asking job applicants about their salary history. The new act’s effective date is January 1, 2019, and covers all employers that have at least one employee in that state.

  • July 26

    The expansion of the The North Carolina Certificate of Relief  Law, offers relief to jobseekers. An employer may take into consideration a certificate of relief despite the applicant’s criminal past; however, the certificate is not an expungement or pardon.

  • July 26

    With growing concerns about liability, businesses are transitioning away from one-time background checks in favor of continuous checks. The results are impacting both employers and employees.


  • July 25 Uber is officially launching a new ongoing criminal monitoring policy for drivers. The company started rolling out the new system in early July and will expand it in the months to come.