Blog

 
     

Uber CEO Labels Fingerprint Background Checks as 'Unjust'

By Michael Klazema on 6/28/2016

Uber is currently in the midst of numerous background check-related conflicts all over the country. The company, which runs in-house background checks on its drivers, is resisting city or county requirements for additional background checks and licensing in multiple U.S. cities. Most recently, the ridesharing service has objected to running fingerprint background checks on its drivers. Uber has pulled its business out of several cities following the passing of ordinances that would have demanded driver fingerprinting. Austin, Texas is one of several cities that no longer have Uber services due to new background check laws.

Over the past two years, Uber has made several different arguments against fingerprinting. First, since Uber already vets its drivers, company leaders believe it is redundant to require another layer of checks. Second, the company has said that the cost and length of time necessary to process fingerprint checks will scare drivers away from the service. Uber's CEO laid forth another grievance against fingerprint background checks recently, calling them "unjust." Speaking at the Global Entrepreneurship Summit in Palo Alto, CA, Uber CEO Travis Kalanick said that fingerprint background checks make it so that falsely accused people can't get jobs. He connected this claim to Uber's reluctance to obey city and county policies that demand driver fingerprinting.

“Imagine a country where people might get arrested who shouldn’t get arrested," Kalanick said. "Imagine if that country were the U.S. We have systems in place where if you’re arrested, you literally can’t get work, even if you’re found to be innocent. And it’s unjust.”

According to other sources, Kalanick may have overstated the relationship between arrests and employment disqualification. Employers are not barred from hiring applicants with arrest histories. While the FBI fingerprint database does store both arrest and conviction information, the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) strongly recommends that employers do not take arrest histories into account when vetting job applicants. Since arrests without convictions offer no proof of guilt, they are not a reliable barometer to use in judging an applicant's character. As such, there is no scenario in which Uber would be required to disqualify a prospective driver because of an arrest record. In fact, the company would risk lawsuits or other potential trouble from the EEOC if they were to use arrests to inform employment decisions.

Largely because of the EEOC's stance on using arrest records in hiring decisions, most background checks do not include arrest information. Even fingerprint background checks can exclude these findings. Regardless of whether or not Uber's fingerprint checks included arrest information, the company would not be bound to use findings for employment decisions.

Sources:

http://wtkr.com/2016/06/23/uber-ceo-explains-why-he-thinks-fingerprinting-drivers-is-unjust/

http://www.fingerprinting.com/background-check.php


Tag Cloud
Categories
Recent Posts

Latest News

  • October 15  What’s new with Uber and Lyft background checks? We look at the latest developments in ridesharing and driver screening.
  • October 10 Seasonal work plays a critical role in the economy every year as companies bulk up for the rush of holiday business. Does the pressure to quickly build staff stop businesses from using strong background screenings?
  • October 08 LifeWay is a Nashville-based organization that supplies bibles, hymnals, educational materials, and other resources to thousands of churches nationwide. LifeWay offers the OneSource program, which connects churches and organizations to discounted services for background checks.
  • October 03 A fingerprint background check is often considered the gold standard of background checks. How far back does a fingerprint background check go?
  • October 03 Businesses continue to take advantage of outside contractors to perform work, but is the approach too hands-off? Avoiding common pitfalls requires practical hiring policies.
  • October 01 For years, the idea of a temporary (or “temp”) worker remained relatively rare. Some businesses have always used temps and temp agencies to fill stopgap needs, but such practices have not been widespread—until now. The rise of the gig economy has pushed businesses in nearly every industry to reconsider their hiring strategies. 
  • September 26 White-collar crimes such as fraud and embezzlement can severely impact a business internally and externally. How can companies protect themselves from this threat? 
  • September 25 Do Nevada background check laws include a reporting limit on criminal convictions? We set the record straight on this confusing subject.
  • September 24 Employee background checks and volunteer background checks are among the most critical strategies that religious organizations can use to make sure those protections are in place. 
  • September 19 Some employers believe that looking at an applicant's life online can yield important insights for hiring. Is a social media screening useful—or even legal?