Blog

 
     

Will My Speeding Ticket Show Up on a Background Check?

By Michael Klazema on 7/11/2018

If you’ve recently been cited for breaking the speed limit, you may be wondering whether the infraction could have an impact on your job prospects. Will the average pre-employment background check find your speeding ticket? Do you need to disclose the ticket if asked about criminal history on a job application?

A simple traffic ticket is not a criminal citation. Minor traffic offenses are civil citations, which means they are not considered misdemeanors (or felonies) and are not a part of your criminal record. As a result, a speeding ticket will not show up on a background check if the check focuses on criminal history.

However, criminal background searches are not the only types of background checks employers might run on you. A prospective employer may wish to look at other parts of your background, including your motor vehicle history. A driving record check will likely show your recent traffic violation. If you are applying for a job that involves driving, assume the employer will look at your driving record and see your speeding ticket—as well as any other traffic violations from the recent past (usually seven years).

The nature of the ticket may impact whether it is an issue. If you received your first-ever speeding ticket and were only driving five miles per hour over the speed limit, that is viewed differently than being ticketed for speeding three times in the past six months or driving 30 miles per hour faster than the posted limit. More severe traffic offenses, such as reckless driving or being a habitual traffic offender, can result in a misdemeanor conviction. Those infractions will show up on a criminal background check.

Are you curious to know what your record looks like? Run criminal or driving record checks on yourself using backgroundchecks.com’s personal tools. These self-checks can give you a better sense of what employers might be seeing (and assuming) based on your record.


Tag Cloud
Categories
Recent Posts

Latest News

  • May 16 Following the passing of a new federal law, daycare providers in North Dakota found themselves constrained and struggling to meet demand. In response, the state has streamlined its process.
  • May 14

    After dismissing several black workers at an Illinois distribution center, Walmart is facing EEOC complaints that claim its background check policies have a disparate impact on minorities.

     

  • May 09 Aiming to create a fairer rental economy, Colorado's governor recently signed legislation putting new limits on how landlords can use background checks.
  • May 07 A lawyer is gathering clients for a potential lawsuit against the Boy Scouts of America. The clients range from 15 to 75 years of age and have all alleged sexual abuse against BSA leaders.
  • May 02 Following a high-profile IPO, and in an ongoing effort to improve the real and perceived safety of its ridesharing services, Lyft has joined the growing list of companies using ongoing criminal monitoring.
  • April 30 97 percent of employers run at least one type of background check. Are there any jobs available with no background check required?
  • April 30 New programs and presentations in Indiana are helping individuals in the state learn more about criminal record expungement. Indiana passed a “second chance law” regarding expungement in 2013.
  • April 25 With a new "Clean Slate" bill before the Connecticut legislature, lawmakers must consider whether to automatically expunge certain criminal records. Proponents say it will broaden opportunities and reduce recidivism.
  • April 23 Hospital background checks are an important safeguard for protecting patients and shielding hospitals from liability and legal risk. Here are some of the most common healthcare background checks.
  • April 23 A property management company hired a maintenance worker last fall because her background check came back clean. In reality, she had convictions for identity theft, drug possession, forgery, and more.